Thoughts on the new JSTOR project, Understanding Shakespeare

Take a look at this new tool that JSTOR and the Folger Shakespeare Library just released: Understanding Shakespeare. You can discover, for example, that 8 articles have cited the first line of Macbeth, then click into each one of them. What do you think? Does this provide an electronic browsing experience?

My thoughts: I very much appreciate this project and I think it helps us to visualize the possibilities of electronic browsing, as do many digital humanities projects.

Access to meandering citation trails is valuable to visualizing the landscape of scholarship. I'm trying to learn more about open linked data, as it seems to have the potential to build a more challenging context for a work such as Macbeth, going beyond citation trails and providing access to (and even prompts to explore) underlying patterns of use, subject matter, etc. 

Let's view this image alongside our discussion of Shakespeare and ebrowsing. This is 'Vortices' by René Descartes, from Principia Philosophiae (1644) This was a widely accepted model of the universe in the 17th Century.

Let's view this image alongside our discussion of Shakespeare and ebrowsing. This is 'Vortices' by René Descartes, from Principia Philosophiae (1644) This was a widely accepted model of the universe in the 17th Century.

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Kate Joranson

Business Reference Librarian, Katz Graduate School of Business, University of Pittsburgh Kate Joranson studied art at the University of Wisconsin, earned her MFA at Ohio State University, and an MLIS at the University of Pittsburgh. As both a librarian and an artist, she enjoys the accidental nature of looking for one thing, and finding something else. As a blogger, she cultivates collisions and connections among seemingly disparate interests. Snow drifts, messy kitchens, market research, and pink scaffolding are all topics you may encounter on her blog, where she explores search engines as a medium. Also: small business owner, gardener, knitter.